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Water Conservation Tips:

In the Bathroom - Turn off the water tap while brushing your teeth.  Fill a cup with water for rinsing after brushing.  
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Operation and Maintenance of the Primary Water Supply Systems

The respective Joint Board of Management for the Lake Huron and Elgin Area Primary Water System owns and governs the area water systems using the City of London as the Administering Municipality. Accordingly, the City of London provides all associated administrative and management services on behalf of the Joint Boards. The area water systems are operated and maintained by the Ontario Clean Water Agency (OCWA) under contract to the respective Joint Board of Management. The basic guiding principles of the administration and operation the Boards' water systems are (listed in no particular order):

  • Quality of Service:  The Operator must meet or exceed the level of water quality currently delivered to our customers as stipulated in the Contract, which surpasses the Ontario Drinking Water Standards;

  • Operating Flexibility/Innovation, Efficiency:  The Joint Boards wish to encourage performance improvement throughout the Joint Boards' System.  Changes that have major implications on the Joint Boards' System will require the approval of the Joint Board.  Where financial gains are made from improved efficiency, it is anticipated that such gains will be shared between the Joint Boards and the Operator;

  • Asset Protection and Maintenance:  The Joint Boards wish to ensure that the System at the end of the Contract is returned in a condition as mutually agreed to in the contract which, in any event, will be in a condition better than their pre-contract condition;

  • Continuity of Service:  Service shall be maintained throughout the term of the Contract and through any transition period to a new Operator;

  • Environmental Impact:  Environmental impact will be minimized and, at the very least, the existing performance will be maintained;

  • Municipal Control:  The Joint Boards must maintain overall control over the assets, capital construction, system growth, and the long-term development of the system;

  • Value for Service:  The Operator must provide the best service for the price offered, as well as provide cost control mechanisms;

  • Capital Projects:  The Joint Boards are responsible for developing, approving, funding and controlling the implementation of all capital projects. The input of the Operator on capital projects will be sought.  The Joint Boards are particularly interested in receiving innovative suggestions from the Operator that will enhance the Joint Boards' System performance; and,

  • Appropriate Allocation of Risk:  Throughout the term of the Contract, an appropriate balance of risk and benefit will be established between the Joint Boards and the Operator.

The Lake Huron Water Treatment Facility

Lake Huron Water Treatment PlantThe water treatment facility for the Lake Huron Primary Water Supply System, located approximately 2 kilometers north of the village of Grand Bend on Highway 21, has a treatment capacity of 340 million litres per day (75 million Imperial gallons per day or 90 million US gallons per day) and supplies water to the municipalities of Bluewater, South Huron, Lambton Shores, North Middlesex, Lucan-Biddulph, Middlesex Centre, Strathroy-Caradoc and London.

The intake crib for the water treatment facility is located approximately two kilometers offshore in about 10 meters of water. The intake structure is designed for the plantís ultimate treatment capacity of 454 million litres per day for when the plant eventually expands.

The water treatment system employs conventional chemically assisted flocculation and sedimentation systems, dual-media filtration, and gaseous chlorine as the primary disinfectant. The treatment system and water quality is continuously monitored using online analyzers and computerized Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Lake Huron High Lift Pumps

The water treatment plant has five 3000hp high-lift discharge pumps, which pump the water from the plant at an average pressure of 1380 kPa (200 PSI) through the 47 kilometer long 1200mm (48 inch) pipeline to the Arva terminal reservoir north of the City of London. During higher demand periods, typically in the summer months, an intermediate reservoir and booster pumping station located near West McGillivray is used to boost the water to the City of London.

In the event of a power failure, the water treatment plant has four 2.5 megawatt diesel generators onsite, which is enough to supply power to the entire water treatment plant in the event of an emergency.

The Elgin Water Treatment Facility

Elgin Area Water Treatment PlantThe water treatment facility for the Elgin Area Primary Water Supply System, located approximately 2 kilometers east of the village of Port Stanley on County Road 24 (Dexter Line), has a treatment capacity of 91 million litres per day (20 million Imperial gallons per day or 24 million US gallons per day) and supplies water to the municipalities of Southwold, St. Thomas, Central Elgin, Aylmer, Malahide, Bayham and London.

The intake crib for the water treatment facility is located approximately 1.5 kilometers offshore in about 10 meters of water. The crib intake structure is designed for the plantís ultimate treatment capacity of 182 million litres per day for when the plant eventually expands.

The water treatment system utilizes conventional chemically assisted flocculation and sedimentation systems, dual-media filtration, and chlorine as the primary disinfectant. The treatment system and water quality is continuously monitored using online analyzers and computerized Supervisor Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Elgin Area High Lift PumpsThe water treatment plant has four 700hp high-lift discharge pumps, which pump the water from the plant at an average pressure of 600 kPa (85 PSI) through two 15 kilometer long pipelines to the Elgin-Middlesex Terminal Reservoir northeast of the City of St. Thomas. The water is then re-pumped to St. Thomas, London, Central Elgin, Malahide and Aylmer from the Terminal Reservoir. The pipelines which supply water to the Terminal Reservoir also supply water to the village of Port Stanley and the municipalities of Central Elgin, Malahide and Bayham along County Road 24 (Dexter Line)

Because the two area water systems are inter-connected through the City of London, the Lake Huron Water Supply System can supply water to the Elgin Area Water Supply System in the event of an emergency.

 

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